While I am re-writing our PING study to become a substantial target article, John is sending it to various journals in the mean time to poke about their editorial biases. Here’s a recent reply, which was thankfully quite up front about the bias: From: Frontiers <noreply@frontiersin.org> Sent: Monday, September 25, 2017 5:05 PM To: j122177@hotmail.com […]

Not an endorsement of this technology or the use of it, just stating that it will happen. Given sufficient measurement precision, all humans have unique genomes and fingerprints, but also faces and voices. The first two are well known and somewhat difficult to measure. However, the last two are very easy to measure, even at […]

This is a follow-up summary of my new interview with Tara McCarthy. The problems Science is a broad cluster of methods and practices used to discover patterns in nature while minimizing the influence of random error and human biases. We have come far the last few hundred years, but we still have very far to […]

I don’t know of any scientific studies, but there’s been a bunch of shows where they put teams of women and men on islands and had them try to survive etc. The results were quite predictable, though I want to note that the producers could have biased things by picking particularly incompetent women and competent […]

Using the crude measures of literacy and numeracy discussed in a previous post, it is possible to quantify the cognitive ability gap for US Black-White in the 1800s. The data come from: A’Hearn, B., Baten, J., & Crayen, D. (2009). Quantifying quantitative literacy: Age heaping and the history of human capital. The Journal of Economic […]

These are the Google Translated versions of the original French. We are trying to obtain regional data for Belgian communes to use for our study, as well as nationality or group level data for general interest. You can see the preliminary analyses here. Needless to say, it is hard to find out what is actually […]

How easy is it to get provocative findings using mainstream methods published? Well, it depends on how provocative. Here’s a second round of generally nonsensical reviews for our PING paper (which you can read here and judge yourself: a good chunk of readers of this blog are themselves researchers and don’t need others to review […]

This must be the most hilariously trolly study I’ve seen in a while. Understanding the Therapist Contribution to Psychotherapy Outcome: A Meta-Analytic Approach Understanding the role that therapists play in psychotherapy outcome, and the contribution to outcome made by individual therapist differences has implications for service delivery and training of therapists. In this study we […]

Readers will perhaps recall that I tried to come up with some metrics for the polygenicity of a trait back in 2016. Well, there’s a new preprint now: Estimation of complex effect-size distributions using summary-level statistics from genome-wide association studies across 32 complex traits and implications for the future Summary-level statistics from genome-wide association studies […]