Article out: First Names, Cognitive Ability and Social Status in Denmark

Kirkegaard, E. O. W. (2019). First Names, Cognitive Ability and Social Status in Denmark. Mankind Quarterly, 59(4). Retrieved from mankindquarterly.org/archive/issue/59-4/5 It is well established that general intelligence varies in the population and is causal for variation in later life outcomes, in particular for social status and education. We linked IQ-test scores from the Danish draft…

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New paper out: Filling in the Gaps: The Association between Intelligence and Both Color and Parent-Reported Ancestry in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997

We’ve got a new important paper out in the special issue on race and intelligence in Psych: Hu et al, 2019, Filling in the Gaps: The Association between Intelligence and Both Color and Parent-Reported Ancestry in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, Psych Little research has dealt with intragroup ancestry-related differences in intelligence in…

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Immigrant IQ gains by generation: evidence from PIAAC

Thanks to Chet Robie for sending me his study. There’s been quite a bit of research on immigrant IQs. From within our network, Heiner Rindermann and James Thompson published a long analysis of scholastic achievement data: Rindermann, H., & Thompson, J. (2016). The cognitive competences of immigrant and native students across the world: An analysis…

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FAQ for “Cognitive ability and political preferences in Denmark” Kirkegaard, Bjerrekær, Carl (2017)

Kirkegaard, E. O. W., Bjerrekær, J. D., & Carl, N. (2017). Cognitive ability and political preferences in Denmark. Open Quantitative Sociology & Political Science, 1(1). Various critics of Noah Carl are being asked to produce something that shows they have read and understand his research, and they appear to be struggling. In an attempt to…

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“a kind of social paranoia, a belief that mysterious, hostile forces are operating to cause inequalities in educational and occupational performance, despite all apparent efforts to eliminate prejudice and discrimination”

Quoting from Arthur Jensen’s book Educability and group differences (1973). He was being criticized for postulating genetic causes, which some critics think would cause great social harm if they were to be believed. That is, Jensen was replying to the Turkheimers of yesteryear. The scientific task is to get at the facts and properly verifiable…

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Death by affirmative action: race quotas in medicine

See also previous 2017 post. I have been repeatedly asked about this topic, so here is a post that covers the basics. The argument goes like this: Affirmation action is used in admission to medical schools, i.e. they practice race quotas in favor of less intelligent races, in particular blacks and hispanics, and discriminate against…

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