A reader asked me to comment on the predictions/musings by Marty Nemko at his blog. I had never heard of him before, but he’s some kind of coach, radio host and columnist popular in the Bay Area. The decline in good jobs. My optimistic side predicts that improved education and gene editing to improve intelligence […]

I stumbled upon another physicist venturing into someone else’s field and getting things right. I quote from Pinker’s Better Angels: In the early 1950s, two eminent British scholars reflected on the history of war and ventured predictions on what the world should expect in the years to come. One of them was Arnold Toynbee (1889–1975), […]

In a not so well written paper (that we should update to be better presented), John Fuerst and I previously used two hypotheses using the National Longitudinal Survey of Freshman dataset: Spatial transferability: when people move, they tend to keep their psychological traits and culture. Generational transferability: when people have children, their children tend to […]

Installing R packages on Windows is easy: you run the install code and it always works. Not so on Linux! Here one sometimes has to install them thru apt-get (or whatever package manager) or install some missing system-level dependencies. Finding what to do can take a lot of time gooling and trial and error. So, […]

I’m posting this here so I can find it more easily because this is at least the third time I had to google the issue to retrace my own steps on StackOverflow to find the solution I found last time! I even found some useful comments I wanted to upvote, only to realize they were […]

I was recently asked to suggest introductory reviewing materials for bright laymen (see also my previous post). I ended up giving the following recommendations: – Intelligence: A very short introduction (2001, by Deary, very mainstream researcher). 132 pages. Libgen – Intelligence: All that matters. 2015. Ritchie (young, mainstream researcher). 160 pages. Libgen Bit more technical, […]

For some research designs, one pays the participants by the amount of time they spend on the task (like regular work). For other designs where one does not, usually participants are able to drop out if one annoys them too much. In both cases it is important to use brief measures. Still, when one uses […]

There is a famous paper arguing the case for libertarian paternalism by using organ donation consent rates. Johnson, E. J., & Goldstein, D. (2003). Do defaults save lives?. Science, 302(5649), 1338-1339. The main result is this: So having opt-out drastically increases consent rates compared with opt-in. These countries have various other differences between them, but […]

I learned about this topic many years ago reading Scott Lilienfeld‘s 50 Myths of popular psychology. In it, they write: In his blockbuster bestselling book Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking, journalist Malcolm Gladwell (2005) argued that experts reach decisions by focusing on the most relevant information and making accurate snap judgments. They can […]

I saw this paper at random: The consequences of heavy alcohol use remain a serious public health problem. Consistent evidence has demonstrated that both genetic and social influences contribute to alcohol use. Research on gene-environment interaction (GxE) has also demonstrated that these social and genetic influences do not act independently. Instead, certain environmental contexts may […]