I stumbled upon another physicist venturing into someone else’s field and getting things right. I quote from Pinker’s Better Angels: In the early 1950s, two eminent British scholars reflected on the history of war and ventured predictions on what the world should expect in the years to come. One of them was Arnold Toynbee (1889–1975), […]

In a not so well written paper (that we should update to be better presented), John Fuerst and I previously used two hypotheses using the National Longitudinal Survey of Freshman dataset: Spatial transferability: when people move, they tend to keep their psychological traits and culture. Generational transferability: when people have children, their children tend to […]

I was recently asked to suggest introductory reviewing materials for bright laymen (see also my previous post). I ended up giving the following recommendations: – Intelligence: A very short introduction (2001, by Deary, very mainstream researcher). 132 pages. Libgen – Intelligence: All that matters. 2015. Ritchie (young, mainstream researcher). 160 pages. Libgen Bit more technical, […]

For some research designs, one pays the participants by the amount of time they spend on the task (like regular work). For other designs where one does not, usually participants are able to drop out if one annoys them too much. In both cases it is important to use brief measures. Still, when one uses […]

I learned about this topic many years ago reading Scott Lilienfeld‘s 50 Myths of popular psychology. In it, they write: In his blockbuster bestselling book Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking, journalist Malcolm Gladwell (2005) argued that experts reach decisions by focusing on the most relevant information and making accurate snap judgments. They can […]

There is a lot of research on the link between crime and cognitive ability. (For criminal outcomes, see the problems in my previous post.) E.g. Is the Association between General Cognitive Ability and Violent Crime Caused by Family-Level Confounders? We linked longitudinal Swedish total population registers to study the association of general cognitive ability (intelligence) […]

Many people listen to some kind of music while working, or perhaps to some kind of colored noise. Many people will swear that this works. There are multiple ways it can work: Increases work performance. Increase work enjoyment (positive mood effect). Makes work seem to go faster (time experience effect). They are not necessarily causally […]

Noah Carl has been investigating the relationship between cognitive ability and political opinions aside from the usual confused 1-axis left-right model. Specifically, looking at the economic freedom and personal freedom axes (á la this test). He did this in two datasets so far, covering the UK and the US: Verbal intelligence is correlated with socially […]

Normally, testing colorism or other causal models of why human racial traits have nonzero relationships to socioeconomic outcomes requires that one has the following data: Measure of racial ancestry Measures of racial appearance Measures of socioeconomic outcomes such as income or educational attainment Path model wise, one can think of it this way: Discrimination models […]

In a recent paper, Beaver et al looked at the relationships between crime, gender and sexual orientation: This study examined the association between sexual orientation and nonviolent and violent delinquency across the life course. We analyzed self-reported nonviolent and violent delinquency in a sample of heterosexual males (N=5220–7023) and females (N=5984–7875), bisexuals (N=34–73),gay males (N=145–189), […]