Woodley reminded me of the dysgenics for health outcomes by linking me to a study about the increasing rates of cancer. I had first reached this conclusion back in 2005 when I realized what it means for evolution that we essentially keep almost everyone alive despite their genetic defects. The problem is quite simple: mutations […]

I have been tweeting annotated snippets from a WHO report I’m reading. Like this: Improving the health of your own citizens before foreigners? Not good! pic.twitter.com/HOix8gOZOr — Emil OW Kirkegaard (@KirkegaardEmil) August 8, 2017 Basically, the report does a decent job at summarizing the state of the art in 2002, and has some interesting notes […]

Comment on: Sariaslan, A. et al. (2016). Long-Term Outcomes Associated with Traumatic Brain Injury in Childhood and Adolescence: A Nationwide Swedish Cohort Study of a Wide Range of Medical and Social Outcomes Real abstract is too damn long, this is my TL;DR version: Sibling control study of TBI as a causal effect for various outcomes. […]

There is a famous paper arguing the case for libertarian paternalism by using organ donation consent rates. Johnson, E. J., & Goldstein, D. (2003). Do defaults save lives?. Science, 302(5649), 1338-1339. The main result is this: So having opt-out drastically increases consent rates compared with opt-in. These countries have various other differences between them, but […]

Medical researchers have noticed that some diseases differ by SIRE (self-identified race/ethnicity) groups which differ by genomic (racial) ancestry. Hence, when genomic measures became available (last 15 years or so), they measured peoples relative proportions of ancestry in mixed populations to see if the diseases would be predictable by ancestry. They were. This establishes with […]

A link on Reddit claimed that exercise could be an effective treatment for depression. I felt it necessary to comment that: Exercise does not have a causal effect on depression or happiness according to twin-control studies (1, 2). Another person replied with a meta-analysis which I then took a look at. It showed a large […]

BMI (body mass index) is often used a proxy for fat percent or similar measures. This is for a good reason: So, the mean correlation across age groups and gender is very high, around .77 (unweighted mean across genders). There is a clear age gradient such that the correlation being higher at younger ages, which […]

Same guy proposed another idea. Wikipedia has data here. However, since i had previously seen that people fudge data on Wikipedia articles (e.g. this one), then maybe it was not a good idea to just rely on Wikipedia. So i did the best thing: fetched both the data from Wiki and the data from the […]

An online acquaintance asked me me to find data about these two and look for a relationship. It stands to reason that if you have a country where people die of lots of other things (accidents, warfare, parasites/contagious disease, hunger/thirst), they don’t ling long enough to get cancer. I already had life expectancy data from […]

www.goodreads.com/book/similar/19171192-bad-pharma-how-drug-companies-mislead-doctors-and-harm-patients lib.free-college.org/view.php?id=864114   Having already read Peter Gøtzsche’s Dødelig medicin og organiseret kriminalitet: Hvordan medicinalindustrien har korrumperet sundhedsvæsenet. Art People, 2013, this book did not bring so much new. However, it did present things better than Gøtzsche did. To be fair, he focused mostly on proving that the farma industry are organized criminals. I agree, […]