Back in January, Steve Hsu did an interview with Daphne Martschenko who is a phd candidate at Cambridge in education. She’s basically doing science journalism on behavioral genetics as far as I can tell. Now there’s a new interview up. I have some comments to it because Steve was a little too nice. Bias from […]

Read Gwern’s review: Aside from that, it’s a lot of wasted opportunity. For instance, the income~IQ relationship. The discussion is extremely economisty. Not even mentioned that people vary a lot in their job preferences for job types which is linked to the wages of these jobs. This creates a lot of noise for the […]

So, I posted this: Abstract We used data from the PING study (n≈1200) to examine the relationship between cognitive ability, socioeconomic outcomes and genomic racial ancestry. We found that when genomic ancestry was not included in models, self-reported race/ethnicity (SIRE) was a useful predictor of cognitive ability/S, but when genomic ancestry was included, SIRE lost […]

Here’s a collection of previously unused datasets (by hereditarians) that are useful. Australia: 45 and Up. Huge, n=250k, medical dataset that has country of origin and many socioeconomic indicators. Costs a lot of money to obtain access. United States: Mean income from census Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study (CILS) United Kingdom: Prison population by nationality […]


Some of the talks from ISIR 2016 in Saint Petersburg are now online. In particular, I enjoyed Detterman’s talk, but of course I think he is too pessimistic about reproductive genetics. All the talks were recorded, but only the long ones with the most famous people are published so far, so you will have to […]

parties_supporters Analysis of the data collected so far, presented side by side with R code. It will be expanded into a proper paper and submitted to OQSPS soonish. Soonish here meaning when Noah gets around to do it! Due to the surprising results, we should probably do a follow-up replication using new subjects. These results […]


One of the things that bother me with the current research on gender differences in personality is the reference group approach problem. Researchers ask questions that require participants to make comparisons between themselves and some implicit group. Gerhard Meisenberg pointed out the problem with this approach for cross-cultural research: A potentially remediable source of low […]

In a not so well written paper (that we should update to be better presented), John Fuerst and I previously used two hypotheses using the National Longitudinal Survey of Freshman dataset: Spatial transferability: when people move, they tend to keep their psychological traits and culture. Generational transferability: when people have children, their children tend to […]

I was recently asked to suggest introductory reviewing materials for bright laymen (see also my previous post). I ended up giving the following recommendations: – Intelligence: A very short introduction (2001, by Deary, very mainstream researcher). 132 pages. Libgen – Intelligence: All that matters. 2015. Ritchie (young, mainstream researcher). 160 pages. Libgen Bit more technical, […]