Some people claim that the climate has direct causal influences on income, cognitive ability and so on. Usually, these academics just regress IQ on climate variables at the country or US state-level. However, it is possible to do it at the US county-level too. Unfortunately, it is difficult to find climate data by the county. […]

I am doing an S factor study of US counties in the usual way. For that reason, I need some kind of county-level cognitive ability estimate. I know that this is possible to create using the Add Health database, but that the data are not sharable. However, it may be possible to do some tricks, […]

I forgot to post this blog post at the time of publication as I usually do. However, here it is. As explored in some previous posts, John Fuerst and I have spent about 1.25 years (!) producing a massive article: published version runs 119 pages; 25k words without the references; 159k characters incl. spaces. We […]

This is actually an older post, but by accident I posted it on the Danish language sister blog. @KirkegaardEmil Really? t.co/kWjEyvhGYD — JayMan (@JayMan471) September 4, 2015 I don’t know what study that is, however, I do have numbers for the performance of Yugoslavians in Denmark and Norway. There are both numbers for persons from […]

Comment on: infoproc.blogspot.dk/2016/02/missing-heritability-and-gcta-update-on.html First, skim this paper: journals.plos.org/ploso… Genomic prediction works fairly well. This recent paper does a cross-data cross-method analysis of genomic prediction methods using 10 fold cross-validation to account for overfitting. In general, the compressed sensing/lasso/regularization methods perform well, but surprisingly an even simpler method comes out on top (mRMR): Maximum Relevancy Minimum […]

Paper is on Scihub. There are a few researchers engaged in the cognitive sociology adventure. Aside from myself and John Fuerst, Noah Carl has also taken up the task. There is of course also Richard Lynn, the grand old man of these studies (publishing his first in 1979). Mostly the job of doing these analyses […]

Consider the model below: Something much like this has been my intuitive working model for thinking about immigrant groups’ traits and socioeconomic outcomes. I will explain the model in this post and refer back to it or use the material in some upcoming paper (nothing planned). The model shows the home country/a country of origin […]

It seems that no one has integrated this literature yet. I will take a quick stab at it here. It could be expanded into a proper paper later in case someone wants to and have time to do that. Stereotypes Lee Jussim (also blog) has done a tremendous job at reviewing the stereotype in recently […]

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sensitivity_analysis Researcher degrees of freedom refer to the choices researchers make when conducting a study. There are many choices to be made, where to collect data, which variables to include, etc. However, a large subset of the choices concern only the question of how to analyze the data. Still I have now done 100s of […]

Just a quick analysis. When I read the Dutch crime report that forms the basis of this paper, I noticed one table that had crime rates by the proportion of immigrants in the neighborhood. Generally, one would expect r (immigrant% x S) to be negative and since r (S x crime) is negative, one would […]