Dunkel, C. S., Woodley of Menie, M. A., Pallesen, J., & Kirkegaard, E. O. (2019). Polygenic scores mediate the Jewish phenotypic advantage in educational attainment and cognitive ability compared with Catholics and Lutherans. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences. So predictably, our study on Jewish IQ has elicited some rather harsh (and in some cases moralistic) criticisms from […]

A common comment on bias in scientific peer review is that reviewers don’t usually say openly they are applying double standards. Instead, they just silently increase their standards. If their bias against some finding is strong, the evidential burden to meet goes to infinity, making sure that nothing is rigorous enough to pass review. A […]

Mehta, C. M., Malins, J. G., Noble, K. G., & Gruen, J. R. (2017). Cortical area and subcortical volume mediate the effect of parental education and adverse experiences on cognitive performance in youth. bioRxiv, 160424. Remember “poverty shrinks the brain from birth”? From birth! Fast acting that poverty, actually before birth too. Anyway, Kimberly Noble […]

In 2016, a Brazilian PHD student with access to the Brazilian Pelotas dataset was kind enough to run a few regressions for us. We apparently forgot to make the results public, but do so now so others can see. I have also previously analyzed some of this data which was later published in an obscure […]

Antonio Regalado is providing us with a recent series of the arguably best informed (compared to Guardian, Nature news etc.) popular science articles on genomics and its relevance to modern eugenics (embryo selection or genetic engineering) as well as the group differences causation question. www.technologyreview.com/s/609204/eugenics-20-were-at-the-dawn-of-choosing-embryos-by-health-height-and-more/ www.technologyreview.com/s/610251/forecasts-of-genetic-fate-just-got-a-lot-more-accurate/ www.technologyreview.com/s/610339/dna-tests-for-iq-are-coming-but-it-might-not-be-smart-to-take-one/ As background for some of these, I had […]

While I am re-writing our PING study to become a substantial target article, John is sending it to various journals in the mean time to poke about their editorial biases. Here’s a recent reply, which was thankfully quite up front about the bias: From: Frontiers <noreply@frontiersin.org> Sent: Monday, September 25, 2017 5:05 PM To: j122177@hotmail.com […]

How easy is it to get provocative findings using mainstream methods published? Well, it depends on how provocative. Here’s a second round of generally nonsensical reviews for our PING paper (which you can read here and judge yourself: a good chunk of readers of this blog are themselves researchers and don’t need others to review […]

Readers will perhaps recall that I tried to come up with some metrics for the polygenicity of a trait back in 2016. Well, there’s a new preprint now: Estimation of complex effect-size distributions using summary-level statistics from genome-wide association studies across 32 complex traits and implications for the future Summary-level statistics from genome-wide association studies […]

There’s a highly interesting new paper out: The Genetic Basis of Mendelian Phenotypes: Discoveries, Challenges, and Opportunities (Mendelians are also known as monogenic disorders because they are inherited in patterns that follow Mendel’s laws.) Abstract: Discovering the genetic basis of a Mendelian phenotype establishes a causal link between genotype and phenotype, making possible carrier and […]

www.gwern.net/Embryo%20selection#counteracting-dysgenics Gwern has a very long and detailed post/page on embryo selection and related matters. You should definitely read it. He has just added a new section on counteracting dysgenics — the genetic evolution of undesirable traits — and asked for my comments/thoughts. The background for the discussion are the recent genomic findings supporting dysgenic […]