Paul Graham‘s 2004 essay What you can’t say had a big influence on me and remains my favorite essay. In he argued essentially that popular morality shows fashion tendencies i.e. that it varies over time but for no evidence-linked reason. What is at one time considered a grievous moral evil is later considered not a […]

There’s a certain type of person that doesn’t produce any empirical contribution to “Reducing the heredity-environment uncertainty”. Instead, they contribute various theoretical arguments which they take to undermine the empirical data others give. Usually, these people have a background in philosophy or some other theoretical field. A recent example of this pattern is seen on […]

Sometimes people argue that one shouldn’t even be allowed to research race and intelligence causes. I’m sometimes asked directly why I choose to study this topic. Well, I could outline a number of reasons, but this would be endlessly quote mined by SJWs as proof of my wicked spirit. Of course, as usually noted, no […]

I wish to coin a fallacy I’ve seen a number of times, exemplified in this paper: Kempthorne, O. (1978). A BIOMETRICS INVITED PAPER: Logical, epistemological and statistical aspects of nature-nurture data interpretation. Biometrics, 1-23. Abstract: In this paper the nature of the reasoning processes applied to the nature-nurture question is discussed in general and with […]

Eric Turkheimer is by many counts a good scientist. He has about 11.6k citations on Google Scholar, 6.3 since 2013 (i.e. last 5 years). He is prominent enough that he has a Wikipedia page, is a full professor at a University of Virginia (world rank ~150), and has published about 126 articles (according to his […]

Schneider, C. (2015). The censor’s hand: the misregulation of human-subject research. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press. Medical and social progress depend on research with human subjects. When that research is done in institutions getting federal money, it is regulated (often minutely) by federally required and supervised bureaucracies called “institutional review boards” (IRBs). Do–can–these IRBs do […]

This text used to be hosted at Shalizi‘s university website, but it was recently taken down for unknown reasons. However, Internet Archive saves us, and I repost it here because it’s interesting and so it doesn’t get lost. This text has circulated quite a number of times on Usenet, and so far as I know […]

After reading a book defending limitations to free trade/protectionism, it was time for something completely different. So I looked around after any current, well-regarded (in their circles) Austrian libertarian economist. Because I know many ancap people, I just picked one of those they often mentioned: Hans-Hermann Hoppe. Looking over his Wikipedia profile, you’d probably get the general […]

Note: snarky, critical. Happy to be proven wrong. Edit: after writing this, I found some more evidence, but it’s not particularly convincing either. CFAR, The Center for Applied Rationality, is connected to the Less Wrong/rationalist movement. They offer courses where one can: 4-day immersive trainings in applied rationality; form accurate beliefs; learn to get these […]

Along with some other people, I was asked to produce a list of the top 5 books that had the largest influence on me. Five books that have most influenced your worldview @EPoe187 @fsnole1 @hbdchick @DrRobertKing @JayMan471 @KirkegaardEmil @pnin1957 — Ben Winegard (@BenWinegard) June 5, 2017 Note that this is not the same as listing […]