Dahlke, J. A., & Sackett, P. R. (2017). The Relationship Between Cognitive-ability Saturation and Subgroup Mean Differences Across Predictors of Job Performance. Journal of Applied Psychology. Abstract The authors quantify the conventional wisdom that predictors’ correlations with cognitive ability are positively related to subgroup mean differences. Using meta-analytic and large-N data from diverse predictors, they […]

Skoyles, J. R. (1999). Human evolution expanded brains to increase expertise capacity, not IQ. Psycoloquy, 10(002). Chicago Skoyles is arguing a rather implausible claim: Why do modern humans have larger brains than earlier people such as Homo erectus? As large brains cause problems in childbirth, infancy and locomotion, the advantage they offer must be substantial. […]

Anatoly Karlin – The State of the Altsphere (October 2017) He writes: Otherwise, the most popular HBD/IQ blogger, with around 100,000 monthly visits, is… Emil Kirkegaard. This is especially remarkable since his writing tends to the highly technical and he doesn’t have even open comments. I did turn on the comments now, but yeah, kept […]

While I am re-writing our PING study to become a substantial target article, John is sending it to various journals in the mean time to poke about their editorial biases. Here’s a recent reply, which was thankfully quite up front about the bias: From: Frontiers <noreply@frontiersin.org> Sent: Monday, September 25, 2017 5:05 PM To: j122177@hotmail.com […]

Not an endorsement of this technology or the use of it, just stating that it will happen. Given sufficient measurement precision, all humans have unique genomes and fingerprints, but also faces and voices. The first two are well known and somewhat difficult to measure. However, the last two are very easy to measure, even at […]

This is a follow-up summary of my new interview with Tara McCarthy. The problems Science is a broad cluster of methods and practices used to discover patterns in nature while minimizing the influence of random error and human biases. We have come far the last few hundred years, but we still have very far to […]

I don’t know of any scientific studies, but there’s been a bunch of shows where they put teams of women and men on islands and had them try to survive etc. The results were quite predictable, though I want to note that the producers could have biased things by picking particularly incompetent women and competent […]

Using the crude measures of literacy and numeracy discussed in a previous post, it is possible to quantify the cognitive ability gap for US Black-White in the 1800s. The data come from: A’Hearn, B., Baten, J., & Crayen, D. (2009). Quantifying quantitative literacy: Age heaping and the history of human capital. The Journal of Economic […]