I don’t have time to provide extensive citations for this post, so some things are cited from memory. You should be able to locate the relevant literature, but otherwise just ask. Haier, R. J. (2016). The Neuroscience of Intelligence (1 edition). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. Because I’m writing a neuroscience-related paper or two, […]

In many ways, my science — and my colleagues’ science — generally involves collecting evidence for obvious hypotheses that are mainly denied by leftist-leaning people (more precisely, egalitarian). Here’s a brief review. Stereotypes about major demographic groups are quite accurate Jussim of course already showed this, but since it’s still frequently denied, seems that we […]

Back in January, Steve Hsu did an interview with Daphne Martschenko who is a phd candidate at Cambridge in education. She’s basically doing science journalism on behavioral genetics as far as I can tell. Now there’s a new interview up. I have some comments to it because Steve was a little too nice. Bias from […]

So, I posted this: Abstract We used data from the PING study (n≈1200) to examine the relationship between cognitive ability, socioeconomic outcomes and genomic racial ancestry. We found that when genomic ancestry was not included in models, self-reported race/ethnicity (SIRE) was a useful predictor of cognitive ability/S, but when genomic ancestry was included, SIRE lost […]

Some of the talks from ISIR 2016 in Saint Petersburg are now online. In particular, I enjoyed Detterman’s talk, but of course I think he is too pessimistic about reproductive genetics. All the talks were recorded, but only the long ones with the most famous people are published so far, so you will have to […]

I was recently asked to suggest introductory reviewing materials for bright laymen (see also my previous post). I ended up giving the following recommendations: – Intelligence: A very short introduction (2001, by Deary, very mainstream researcher). 132 pages. Libgen – Intelligence: All that matters. 2015. Ritchie (young, mainstream researcher). 160 pages. Libgen Bit more technical, […]

For some research designs, one pays the participants by the amount of time they spend on the task (like regular work). For other designs where one does not, usually participants are able to drop out if one annoys them too much. In both cases it is important to use brief measures. Still, when one uses […]

OKCupid dataset (not public right now, contact me if you want the password). Draft paper: osf.io/p9ixw/ I looked at whether there was evidence for cognitive dysgenics in the OKCupid dataset. The unrepresentativeness of the dataset is not much of a problem here: indeed we are very much interested in younger people looking to date since […]

I forgot to post this blog post at the time of publication as I usually do. However, here it is. As explored in some previous posts, John Fuerst and I have spent about 1.25 years (!) producing a massive article: published version runs 119 pages; 25k words without the references; 159k characters incl. spaces. We […]