“A speaker of the language should be able to pronounce correctly any sequence of letters that he may meet, even if they were previously unknown, and secondarily, to be able to spell any phonemic sequence, again even if previously unknown.” -Archibald A. Hill, distinguished U.S. linguist. I have not been able to confirm the source. […]

Again I’m quoting Paul Ziff’s Semantic Analysis: 41. […] Consequently, if my contention about meaning is correct, then the first ‘do’ in ‘Please do not do it!’, unlike the second ‘do’, does not have meaning. This is testified to by the fact that generally the first ‘do’ in ‘Please do not do it!’, unlike the […]

[Discussing the type/token distinction or ambiguity] “I shall not in general try to eliminate these ambiguities by explicitly stating which sense is intended. Sometimes both senses are intended, sometimes not. In general the context is sufficient to indicate what is meant. I shall be more specific only when there is need to be so; if […]

Abstract I invent and explore a terminology about degrees of sentences, I explore how to negate sentences and sentence parts in english, I distinguish between verbs that can be used in sup-sentence parts and verbs that cannot, I discuss some problems with the verb “ought”, and lastly I explore the relationship between this terminology and […]

Imagine that John complains to Peter that he did not sleep well last night. He then says that he will attempt to sleep weller the next time. This sentence fails. Imagine that John complains to Peter that he did not sleep good last night. He then says that he will attempt to sleep gooder the […]