I read the following interesting paper: Braun, S. T., & Stuhler, J. (2016). The Transmission of Inequality Across Multiple Generations: Testing Recent Theories with Evidence from Germany. The Economic Journal, n/a-n/a. doi.org/10.1111/ecoj.12453 This paper shows that across multiple generations, the persistence of occupational and educational attainment in Germany is larger than estimates from two generations […]

I am doing an S factor study of US counties in the usual way. For that reason, I need some kind of county-level cognitive ability estimate. I know that this is possible to create using the Add Health database, but that the data are not sharable. However, it may be possible to do some tricks, […]

This is actually an older post, but by accident I posted it on the Danish language sister blog. @KirkegaardEmil Really? t.co/kWjEyvhGYD — JayMan (@JayMan471) September 4, 2015 I don’t know what study that is, however, I do have numbers for the performance of Yugoslavians in Denmark and Norway. There are both numbers for persons from […]

Paper is on Scihub. There are a few researchers engaged in the cognitive sociology adventure. Aside from myself and John Fuerst, Noah Carl has also taken up the task. There is of course also Richard Lynn, the grand old man of these studies (publishing his first in 1979). Mostly the job of doing these analyses […]

(Broad-strokes modeling of how to think about immigrant performance. Some references are gone because they were written using the Zotero plugin, which I later uninstalled. I have re-added those I could recall.) Consider the model below: Something much like this has been my intuitive working model for thinking about immigrant groups’ traits and socioeconomic outcomes. […]

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sensitivity_analysis Researcher degrees of freedom refer to the choices researchers make when conducting a study. There are many choices to be made, where to collect data, which variables to include, etc. However, a large subset of the choices concern only the question of how to analyze the data. Still I have now done 100s of […]

John Fuerst suggested that I write a meta-analysis, review and methodology paper on the S factor. That seems like a decent idea once I get some more studies done (data are known to exist on France (another level), Japan (analysis done, writing pending), Denmark, Sweden and Turkey (reanalysis of Lynn’s data done, but there is […]

Due to lengthy discussion over at Unz concerning the good performance of some African groups in the UK, it seems worth it to review the Danish and Norwegian results. Basically, some African groups perform better on some measures than native British. The author is basically arguing that this disproves global hereditarianism. I think not. The […]

Abstract A reanalysis of (Carl, 2015) revealed that the inclusion of London had a strong effect on the S loading of crime and poverty variables. S factor scores from a dataset without London and redundant variables was strongly related to IQ scores, r = .87. The Jensen coefficient for this relationship was .86.   Introduction […]

Abstract A dataset of 127 variables concerning socioeconomic outcomes for US states was analyzed. Of these, 81 were used in a factor analysis. The analysis revealed a general socioeconomic factor. This factor correlated .961 with one from a previous analysis of socioeconomic data for US states.   Introduction It has repeatedly been found that desirable […]