Why tracking COVID-19 hospitalization data makes sense

Every day, I post the updated Danish COVID-19 hospitalization data on Twitter and Facebook The latest version is always available at https://rpubs.com/EmilOWK/COVID19_Denmark. The raw data are here. The figures for March 26th look like this: Why track hospitalizations instead of cases? Because the number of true cases is practically unknown due to lack of large-scale…

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Between country variation in COVID-19 impact

It is by now obvious that there are some quite large differences in how much of an impact COVID-19 is having. As usual with social science, the evidence is a bit of a mess and there’s no good randomized controlled trials. With that caveat, here’s some factors that probably contribute to the variation. Measuring COVID-19…

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Review: The Censor’s Hand (Carl E. Schneider)

Schneider, C. (2015). The censor’s hand: the misregulation of human-subject research. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press. Medical and social progress depend on research with human subjects. When that research is done in institutions getting federal money, it is regulated (often minutely) by federally required and supervised bureaucracies called “institutional review boards” (IRBs). Do–can–these IRBs do…

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WHO on genomics and health, 2002

I have been tweeting annotated snippets from a WHO report I’m reading. Like this: Improving the health of your own citizens before foreigners? Not good! pic.twitter.com/HOix8gOZOr — Emil O W Kirkegaard (@KirkegaardEmil) August 8, 2017 Basically, the report does a decent job at summarizing the state of the art in 2002, and has some interesting…

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Organ donation consent vs. actual rates

There is a famous paper arguing the case for libertarian paternalism by using organ donation consent rates. Johnson, E. J., & Goldstein, D. (2003). Do defaults save lives?. Science, 302(5649), 1338-1339. The main result is this: So having opt-out drastically increases consent rates compared with opt-in. These countries have various other differences between them, but…

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Admixture mapping assisted GWAS

Medical researchers have noticed that some diseases differ by SIRE (self-identified race/ethnicity) groups which differ by genomic (racial) ancestry. Hence, when genomic measures became available (last 15 years or so), they measured peoples relative proportions of ancestry in mixed populations to see if the diseases would be predictable by ancestry. They were. This establishes with…

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