Corvus intelligence

Doing a lot of background reading on animal ecology, I found this review paper: Lefebvre, L. (2013). Brains, innovations, tools and cultural transmission in birds, non-human primates, and fossil hominins. Frontiers in human neuroscience, 7, 245. Recent work on birds and non-human primates has shown that taxonomic differences in field measures of innovation, tool use…

Continue Reading

Evolution and imperfect mediators

Skoyles, J. R. (1999). Human evolution expanded brains to increase expertise capacity, not IQ. Psycoloquy, 10(002). Chicago Skoyles is arguing a rather implausible claim: Why do modern humans have larger brains than earlier people such as Homo erectus? As large brains cause problems in childbirth, infancy and locomotion, the advantage they offer must be substantial….

Continue Reading

“This manuscript addresses a politically sensitive issue that I would prefer not to include in Frontiers in Evolutionary Sociology and Biosociology.”

While I am re-writing our PING study to become a substantial target article, John is sending it to various journals in the mean time to poke about their editorial biases. Here’s a recent reply, which was thankfully quite up front about the bias: From: Frontiers <noreply@frontiersin.org> Sent: Monday, September 25, 2017 5:05 PM To: j122177@hotmail.com

Continue Reading

Review: Race (John Baker)

www.goodreads.com/book/show/875481.Race gen.lib.rus.ec/book/index.php?md5=5624936a816b96dd3e6a4af6808ee69b I had seen references to this book in a number of places which got me curious. I am somewhat hesitant to read older books since I know much of what they discuss is dated and has been superseded by newer science. Sometimes, however, science (or the science culture) has gone wrong so one…

Continue Reading

The Myth of Monogamy: Fidelity and Infidelity in Animals and People (David P. Barash, Judith Eve Lipton)

This book is fairly short and is mostly about sexual selection and sexual antagonism. While other EP lit. uses animal examples, this book is literally full of them. Lots of interesting comparisons with all kinds of birds, for instance. On the continuum of biology — psychology of EP lit., this one is definitely closer to…

Continue Reading

Review: The intelligence of dogs

The Intelligence of Dogs A Guide to the Thoughts, Emotions, and Inner Lives of Our Canine Companions Stanley Coren 320p   This book is not very technical, has almost no numbers or sources in it. It contains a wealth of at times funny anecdotes. It also contains references to shitty science, mostly Gardner and Sternberg’s…

Continue Reading

Review: Missing the Revolution: Darwinism for Social Scientists (Barkow ed.)

[Jerome_H._Barkow]_Missing_the_Revolution_Darwini(Bookos.org) In general, this was a short and interesting read. Made me want to read other material by Anne Campbell. The last chapter is skipable, just as Kanazawa said when he reviewed the book.   –   Women’s “natural” empathy is seen not as an obstacle to impartial observa- tion but rather as an asset…

Continue Reading

More reading material about race and intelligence/IQ/g

I hit open a wealth of good reading material: www.aei.org/article/society-and-culture/religion/the-inequality-taboo/ For those who consider it important to know what percentage of the IQ difference is genetic, a methodology that would do the job is now available. In the United States, few people classified as black are actually of 100-percent African descent (the average American black…

Continue Reading

Art Jensen on Galton + a review of The Legacy of His Ideas by Francis Galton (by Milo Keynes)

GALTON AND THE COMING OF EMPIRICAL PSYCHOLOGY All the early influences on differential psychology mentioned so far came from philosophers. None was an empirical scientist. Darwin was, of course, but Darwinian ideas were introduced into psychology by Herbert Spencer, a pro­ fessional philosopher. The empirical study of mental ability and individual dif­ ferences could not…

Continue Reading