Evolution and imperfect mediators

Skoyles, J. R. (1999). Human evolution expanded brains to increase expertise capacity, not IQ. Psycoloquy, 10(002). Chicago Skoyles is arguing a rather implausible claim: Why do modern humans have larger brains than earlier people such as Homo erectus? As large brains cause problems in childbirth, infancy and locomotion, the advantage they offer must be substantial….

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“This manuscript addresses a politically sensitive issue that I would prefer not to include in Frontiers in Evolutionary Sociology and Biosociology.”

While I am re-writing our PING study to become a substantial target article, John is sending it to various journals in the mean time to poke about their editorial biases. Here’s a recent reply, which was thankfully quite up front about the bias: From: Frontiers <noreply@frontiersin.org> Sent: Monday, September 25, 2017 5:05 PM To: j122177@hotmail.com…

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Review: Race (John Baker)

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/875481.Race http://gen.lib.rus.ec/book/index.php?md5=5624936a816b96dd3e6a4af6808ee69b I had seen references to this book in a number of places which got me curious. I am somewhat hesitant to read older books since I know much of what they discuss is dated and has been superseded by newer science. Sometimes, however, science (or the science culture) has gone wrong so one…

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The Myth of Monogamy: Fidelity and Infidelity in Animals and People (David P. Barash, Judith Eve Lipton)

This book is fairly short and is mostly about sexual selection and sexual antagonism. While other EP lit. uses animal examples, this book is literally full of them. Lots of interesting comparisons with all kinds of birds, for instance. On the continuum of biology — psychology of EP lit., this one is definitely closer to…

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Review: The intelligence of dogs

The Intelligence of Dogs A Guide to the Thoughts, Emotions, and Inner Lives of Our Canine Companions Stanley Coren 320p   This book is not very technical, has almost no numbers or sources in it. It contains a wealth of at times funny anecdotes. It also contains references to shitty science, mostly Gardner and Sternberg’s…

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Review: Missing the Revolution: Darwinism for Social Scientists (Barkow ed.)

[Jerome_H._Barkow]_Missing_the_Revolution_Darwini(Bookos.org) In general, this was a short and interesting read. Made me want to read other material by Anne Campbell. The last chapter is skipable, just as Kanazawa said when he reviewed the book.   –   Women’s “natural” empathy is seen not as an obstacle to impartial observa- tion but rather as an asset…

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