Comments on Marty Nemko’s “12 Predictions for 2050”

A reader asked me to comment on the predictions/musings by Marty Nemko at his blog. I had never heard of him before, but he’s some kind of coach, radio host and columnist popular in the Bay Area. The decline in good jobs. My optimistic side predicts that improved education and gene editing to improve intelligence…

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Predatory journals

I had my first Twitter controversy. So: @StuartJRitchie @FrontiersIn is a predatory open access journal. Publication fee is 1600€ t.co/zxdCppVR0J t.co/BUCXliIXwG — Emil O W Kirkegaard (@KirkegaardEmil) September 27, 2014 @KirkegaardEmil @StuartJRitchie you do realize that you are paying ~5000 per article for 'normal' journals? Nothing predatory about it — rogier kievit (@rogierK) September 28,…

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Review: The Digital Scholar: How Technology is Transforming Academic Practice (Martin Weller)

www.goodreads.com/book/show/12582388-the-digital-scholar gen.lib.rus.ec/book/index.php?md5=5343D586EEEFB7BB24DE5B71FBD07C32 Someone posted a nice collection of books dealing with the on-going revolution in science: I've collected a list of Open Science / digital scholar books – any obvious missign? – t.co/AYcRrtXnhZ #openscience #openaccess — Mikael K. Elbæk (@melbaek) September 25, 2014 So i decided to read some of them. Ironically, many of them…

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Review: G Is for Genes: The Impact of Genetics on Education and Achievement (Kathryn Asbury, Robert Plomin)

www.goodreads.com/book/show/17015094-g-is-for-genes gen.lib.rus.ec/book/index.php?md5=97ac0ec914522d3c888679e9c02291c6 So i kept finding references to this book in papers, so i decided to read it. It is a quick read introducing behavior genetics and the results from it to lay readers and perhaps policy makers. The book is overly long (200) for its content, it cud easily have been cut 30 pages….

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Review: Making sense of heritability

Download: www.libgen.net/search.php?search_type=magic&search_text=making+sense+of+heritability&submit=Dig+for   This is a GREAT book, which goes down to the basics about heritability and the various claims people have made against it. Highly recommended. Best book of the 29 i have read this year.   The denial of genetically based psychological differences is the kind of sophisti- cated error normally accessible only…

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Ripping books from UMDL Text: Leta S. Hollingworth’s Gifted children, their nature and nurture

quod.lib.umich.edu/g/genpub/AGE2118.0001.001?view=toc Due to this book repeatedly coming up in conversation regarding the super smart people, it seems to be worth reading. It is really old, and should obviously be out of copyright (thanks Disney!), however it possibly isn’t and in any case I couldn’t find a useful PDF. I did however find the above. Now,…

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Polymaths, freedom of information, and copyright – why we need copyright reform to more effectively increase the number of polymaths

I forgot to mention that i hav riten a post about polymathy and copyriet reform over at Project Polymath. Reposted below. Direct link to post. —- Introduction Polymaths are people with a deep knowledge of multiple academic fields, and often various other interests as well, especially artistic, but sometimes even things like tropical exploring. Here…

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Paper: The Rhetoric and Reality of Gap Closing (Stephen J. Ceci & Paul B. Papierno)

The rhetoric and reality of gap closing—when the “have-nots” gain but the “haves” gain even more. Abstract Many forms of intervention, across different domains, have the surprising effect of widening preexisting gaps between disadvantaged youth and their advantaged counter- parts—if such interventions are made available to all stu- dents, not just to the disadvantaged. Whether…

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