Admixture analysis and genetic causation: some quotes from the literature

A common comment on bias in scientific peer review is that reviewers don’t usually say openly they are applying double standards. Instead, they just silently increase their standards. If their bias against some finding is strong, the evidential burden to meet goes to infinity, making sure that nothing is rigorous enough to pass review. A…

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Do Republic professors hide their voting intentions?

There’s a lot of evidence for left-wing dominance of academia. One study (Langbert 2018) looked at registered voters and finds quite unbelievable differences: In this article I offer new evidence about something readers of Academic Questions already know: The political registration of full-time, Ph.D.-holding professors in top-tier liberal arts colleges is overwhelmingly Democratic. Indeed, faculty…

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Wanted: scientific immune system to identify weak studies getting lots of attention

In the interest of keeping the scientific enterprise towards finding truth, it is important to reduce the impact of problematic studies in the scientific literature. Studies can be problematic in many ways (e.g. lacks a control for genetic confounding in social science), but one relatively simple problem to automatically identify is low precision due to…

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Making better use of the scientific literature: large-scale automatic retrieval of data from published figures

Science is a set of related methods that aim at finding true patterns about the world. These methods are generally designed so as to remove noise from random circumstances (the traditional focus of statistics) and human biases. Current practices are currently not very good at the second part due to the innumerable ways human biases…

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Why the race and intelligence question is still not resolved

It could probably have been resolved decades ago, and definitely within the last 10 years with genomic data, yet it is still not. Why? Essentially, it’s because of bias in academia. It begins early: data access, then there’s authors’ own publication bias, then finally editorial and reviewing bias (all caused by lack of political/belief diversity…

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Tail effects in climate science and the pleasures of polymathy

From the interactive visualization I previously published to give foster an intuitive understanding of the concept: Tail effects are when there are large differences between groups at the extremes (tails) of distributions. This happens when the distributions differ in either the mean or the standard deviation (or both), even when these differences are quite small….

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How to integrate Winnower, blog posts and ResearchGate?

Abstract I argue that traditional scientific publication is extremely costly and that scientific publication must move towards more rapid publication practices. I discuss how this might be accomplished by integrating blogposts, The Winnower and ResearchGate. Introduction There are a number of important dimensions that scientists consider when they choose how and where to publish their…

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Personality correlates of breadth vs. depth of research scholarship

Also posted on the Project Polymath blog. An interesting study has been published: Thomas S. Bateman, and Andrew M. Hess. Different personal propensities among scientists relate to deeper vs. broader knowledge contributions. PNAS 2015 ; published ahead of print March 2, 2015, www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1421286112 This is relevant to the study of polymathy, which of course involves making…

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