Why didn’t Denmark sell Greenland? Some comments

Gwern has an old note on the US’ offer to buy Greenland from Denmark after WW2. Aside from the usual nationalist feelings about land, the Greenland population is ~25% genetically Scandinavian, presumably mostly Danish. This number is from genomic studies, the sociological counts differ somewhat because they include the mixed persons in the Inuit group…

Continue Reading

Did Turkheimer et al (2003) replicate?

Lots of published psychology studies don’t replicate well, in particular cute things like interactions, counter-intuitive or priming effects. In general, traditional behavioral genetics studies have replicated well. This is not surprising because basically the same method (ACE fitting) has been applied to lots of large datasets, and studies that use consistent methods on large datasets…

Continue Reading

Notes on Steve Hsu’s second interview w/ Daphne Martschenko

Back in January, Steve Hsu did an interview with Daphne Martschenko who is a phd candidate at Cambridge in education. She’s basically doing science journalism on behavioral genetics as far as I can tell. Now there’s a new interview up. I have some comments to it because Steve was a little too nice. Bias from…

Continue Reading

SQL server for population frequencies from 1000 genomes

Note: 2018 June 26 Server down right now, investigating. Note: August 16, 2017 server IP changed to 67.207.92.10. Original post We need dplyr for this: library(dplyr) First, use the anon user to log into the SQL server (user = “anon”, pass = “”, ip = “67.207.92.10”, port = 3306): sql = src_mysql(“population_freqs”, host = “67.207.92.10”,…

Continue Reading

Individual genomic admixture and cognitive ability

So, I posted this: Abstract We used data from the PING study (n≈1200) to examine the relationship between cognitive ability, socioeconomic outcomes and genomic racial ancestry. We found that when genomic ancestry was not included in models, self-reported race/ethnicity (SIRE) was a useful predictor of cognitive ability/S, but when genomic ancestry was included, SIRE lost…

Continue Reading

Useful datasets for country of origin analyses

Here’s a collection of previously unused datasets (by hereditarians) that are useful. Australia: 45 and Up. Huge, n=250k, medical dataset that has country of origin and many socioeconomic indicators. Costs a lot of money to obtain access. United States: Mean income from census Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study (CILS) United Kingdom: Prison population by nationality…

Continue Reading