The northwest-southeast cline in Europe and the brain

A friend sent me this amazing study, seems to have been previously overlooked by hereditarians. Bakken, T. E., Dale, A. M., Schork, N. J., & Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. (2011). A geographic cline of skull and brain morphology among individuals of European Ancestry. Human heredity, 72(1), 35-44. Background Human skull and brain morphology are strongly…

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Extreme phenotype colorism

One prominent model for why (some) nonwhite race groups do worse is that they experience hostile experience based on skin color. For instance, Hunter (2007) writes: How does colorism operate? Systems of racial discrimination operate on at least two levels: race and color. The first system of discrimination is the level of racial category, (i.e….

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Of cats and dogs and men

Genetic variation between populations/races of a species is a nice single summary statistic about how large between population phenotypic differences to expect. In case of humans, this value (Fst, the fixation index) is about 15%. This finding is due to Lewontin (1972) and is now mindlessly repeated (Lewontin’s fallacy) as some kind of slam dunk…

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Psychology of the unthinkable (Tetlock et al 2000)

Tetlock, P. E., Kristel, O. V., Elson, S. B., Green, M. C., & Lerner, J. S. (2000). The psychology of the unthinkable: taboo trade-offs, forbidden base rates, and heretical counterfactuals. Journal of personality and social psychology, 78(5), 853. This old article is a serious gem, and very relevant the troubles of our time. The introduction…

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Paige-Harden, Turkheimer and the psychometric left

Kathryn Paige Harden is professor of psychology who belongs to the Turkheimerian ‘left psychometrics’ school. I’ve discussed the odd behavior of Eric Turkheimer before, but since then I found a rather amazing essay: The Search for a Psychometric Left 1997 (the journal seems to no longer exist). It’s definitely worth reading in its entirely, but…

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A partial test of DUF1220 for population differences in intelligence?

You might have heard the DUF1220 hypothesis, it goes something like this: DUF1220 is a copy number variant poorly tagged by arrays, and thus would not be captured well by typical GWASs for education/IQ. Comparative species data suggests strong selection for DUF1220 with increased intelligence/brain size. There’s some data showing a relationship between IQ in…

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