Data mining Erowid to study drugs

Erowid has thousands of reviews of 100s of different drugs. So it should be possible to easily scrape these reports, and then use various text analysis methods on them to do things like: Clustering of drugs by similarity of experiences These should replicate the pharmacological descriptions, e.g deliriants should cluster together Ratings of overall pleasantness…

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Replies to Birney, Raff, Rutherford & Scally

Ewan Birney, Jennifer Raff, Adam Rutherford, Aylwyn Scally. Race, genetics and pseudoscience: an explainer. Ewan’s Blog: Bioinformatician at large. Additional remarks by Raff on her blog On Race, Genetics, and Pseudoscience Main thing of interest “Over the course of a year, we worked together on a statement that best reflects our consensus view of human…

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Media darling scientists

Being on Twitter you quickly run into some people calling themselves scientists, but who seem to not be doing much science at all and instead spending their time on politics and self-promotion, not to mention book sales. Some years ago, some economists did some numbers on this and came up with the Kardashian Index (original…

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Political bias in science: quotes from Gunnar Myrdal’s 1944 book

Gunnar Myrdal, who was Swedish, expresses an early version of the views the media repeat endlessly these days. To give some examples: White prejudice and discrimination keep the Negro low in standards of living, health, education, manners and morals. This, in its turn, gives support to white prejudice. White prejudice and Negro standards thus mutually…

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Scientific misconduct by ancestry/country

There’s a few studies on this already. This is a rare event/person situation, so sampling error is large and problematic (cf. discussion in esports paper). Ignoring this, we can draw some general conclusions by a quick literature survey. Oransky, I. (2018). Volunteer watchdogs pushed a small country up the rankings. Science. Based on data from…

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Time preferences and national IQ

Wang, M., Rieger, M. O., & Hens, T. (2016). How time preferences differ: Evidence from 53 countries. Journal of Economic Psychology, 52, 115-135. We present results from the first large-scale international survey on time preference, conducted in 53 countries. All countries exhibit hyperbolic discounting patterns, i.e., the immediate future is discounted more than far future….

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