Psychology of the unthinkable (Tetlock et al 2000)

Tetlock, P. E., Kristel, O. V., Elson, S. B., Green, M. C., & Lerner, J. S. (2000). The psychology of the unthinkable: taboo trade-offs, forbidden base rates, and heretical counterfactuals. Journal of personality and social psychology, 78(5), 853. This old article is a serious gem, and very relevant the troubles of our time. The introduction…

Continue Reading

Paige-Harden, Turkheimer and the psychometric left

Kathryn Paige Harden is professor of psychology who belongs to the Turkheimerian ‘left psychometrics’ school. I’ve discussed the odd behavior of Eric Turkheimer before, but since then I found a rather amazing essay: The Search for a Psychometric Left 1997 (the journal seems to no longer exist). It’s definitely worth reading in its entirely, but…

Continue Reading

A partial test of DUF1220 for population differences in intelligence?

You might have heard the DUF1220 hypothesis, it goes something like this: DUF1220 is a copy number variant poorly tagged by arrays, and thus would not be captured well by typical GWASs for education/IQ. Comparative species data suggests strong selection for DUF1220 with increased intelligence/brain size. There’s some data showing a relationship between IQ in…

Continue Reading

The amazing stereotype accuracy of sex differences in movie genre preferences

Wühr, P., Lange, B. P., & Schwarz, S. (2017). Tears or fears? Comparing gender stereotypes about movie preferences to actual preferences. Frontiers in psychology, 8, 428. This study investigated the accuracy of gender-specific stereotypes about movie-genre preferences for 17 genres. In Study 1, female and male participants rated the extent to which 17 movie genres…

Continue Reading

Defense against the psychometricians

Borsboom, D. (2006). The attack of the psychometricians. Psychometrika, 71(3), 425. This paper analyzes the theoretical, pragmatic, and substantive factors that have hampered the integration between psychology and psychometrics. Theoretical factors include the operationalist mode of thinking which is common throughout psychology, the dominance of classical test theory, and the use of “construct validity” as…

Continue Reading

Sample size hypocrisy – Stuart Ritchie edition

Predictably, Stuart Ritchie doesn’t like our Ashkenazim intelligence paper (Why doesn’t he? He dislikes all group difference research. See more below.) He makes a big deal of the fact that the sample size for Wisconsin Ashkenazim was only 53. (He neglects to mention that the comparison group numbered 2000 Christians). It might seem like most…

Continue Reading

FAQ for Dunkel et al 2019 Ashkenazim polygenic score for intelligence

Dunkel, C. S., Woodley of Menie, M. A., Pallesen, J., & Kirkegaard, E. O. (2019). Polygenic scores mediate the Jewish phenotypic advantage in educational attainment and cognitive ability compared with Catholics and Lutherans. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences. So predictably, our study on Jewish IQ has elicited some rather harsh (and in some cases moralistic) criticisms from…

Continue Reading

Updated 23andme results (2019-01-22)

Previous results. 23andme has updated their ancestry estimates, so I’m reposting mine for people who are wondering. The change to previously is that now I’m slightly more European: 99.8% vs. 99.7%. I’m no longer North African, but now I’m 0.1% Amerindian (false positive probably), and less Ashkenazi 2.8% (from 2.9%). They also report regional results…

Continue Reading

What you can’t say: genetic group difference edition

Paul Graham‘s 2004 essay What you can’t say had a big influence on me and remains my favorite essay. In he argued essentially that popular morality shows fashion tendencies i.e. that it varies over time but for no evidence-linked reason. What is at one time considered a grievous moral evil is later considered not a…

Continue Reading

The WORDSUM question

I tweeted about this already, but I’m dumping some notes here for future reference. The Wordsum is a 10 word vocabulary test that’s been used for decades as a brief measure of intelligence. It’s most prominently used in the General Social Survey (GSS), a recurrent US survey of various social matters that’s been going on…

Continue Reading