Species genetic variation and number of subspecies/races/breeds/breeding populations/clusters etc.

A straightforward research idea: Compare the recognized count of subspecies (races/breeds/breeding populations/clusters etc.) with measures of genetic variation. The most obvious is the Fst but it’s not an optimal metric. There is some literature on this: Woodley, M. A. (2010). Is Homo sapiens polytypic? Human taxonomic diversity and its implications. Medical hypotheses, 74(1), 195-201. Fuerst,…

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Of cats and dogs and men

Genetic variation between populations/races of a species is a nice single summary statistic about how large between population phenotypic differences to expect. In case of humans, this value (Fst, the fixation index) is about 15%. This finding is due to Lewontin (1972) and is now mindlessly repeated (Lewontin’s fallacy) as some kind of slam dunk…

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Genomic autocorrelation of quantitative traits

The genetic clustering of Europeans. https://t.co/lGw9dX0sbD Does anyone know of a larger FST table? @razibkhan pic.twitter.com/1vjxeO2F7d — Emil O W Kirkegaard (@KirkegaardEmil) November 7, 2015 See first: Some methods for measuring and correcting for spatial autocorrelation Piffer’s method Piffer’s method to examine the between group heritability of cognitive ability and height uses polygenic scores (either…

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