The Myth of Morality and interpretation

Joyce does a rather strange interpretation in The Myth of Morality p. 121. He writes: However, I doubt we even need concede that much. These “conditional reasons” are very shady customers. Take what seems to be a straightforward one mentioned above: one’s reason to save a drowning child if one exists. There are two readings:…

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Interpretation of “always”

Sometimes it is clear that “always” should be interpreted as various temporal logics suggest. Other times it should not be interpreted as anything that has to do with time. Consider this fictive conversation: “Generally women prefer men with high social above men without.” “Not always.” But the first utterance has nothing to do with time….

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Logical interpretation of subjects, the utterer and the utterance situation

Interpretation I earlier wrote of the logical interpretation of subjects.1 There I suggested, following Russell, that the subject of a descriptive, active, meaningful (DAM) sentence should be interpreted as an existential quantifier (∃x) but I now believe that that this seems to depend on who made the utterance and in which situation. Suppose for instance…

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The term non-sequitur

As Wikipedia notes,i the term is used in everyday speech to deny a conditional (if-then statement), and it is also used in logic to mean an invalid argument. This together with the fact that in normal language people do not write the complete arguments when they argue, makes it very easy to confuse things. Suppose…

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