Few people actually read this, which is a shame because the science is interesting for historical purposes, and the fulltext of his famous fallacy is rarely read. I believe this is a pity because it is really obvious when you actually read it. Lewontin, R. C. (1972). “The Apportionment of Human Diversity”. Evolutionary Biology. pp. […]

Just a minor stats point for an otherwise excellent paper. Woodley of Menie, M. A. &  Fernandes, H. B., & Hopkins, W. D. (2015). The more g-loaded, the more heritable, evolvable, and phenotypically variable: Homology with humans in chimpanzee cognitive abilities. Intelligence, 50, 159-163. They use unit weighted factor analysis, which sounds fancy, but it […]

This year (2018) Robert Sternberg is slated to give a distinguished contributor interview at the ISIR meeting to be held in Edinburgh. There’s already tons of material on his behavior: Extreme self-citations: replicationindex.wordpress.com/2018/04/22/robert-sternbergs-rise-to-fame/ Extreme text recycling (self-plagiarism): steamtraen.blogspot.fr/2018/04/some-instances-of-apparent-duplicate.html Editorial role abuse: www.insidehighered.com/news/2018/04/30/prominent-psychologist-resigns-journal-editor-over-allegations-over-self-citation and more However, here I want to point out an additional angle. Sternberg […]

Rindermann, H. (2018). Cognitive capitalism: human capital and the wellbeing of nations. Cambridge, United Kingdom ; New York, NY: University Printing House. Heiner was kind enough to send me a reviewer’s (paper) copy. Unfortunately, I lack the time to write up a formal book review, and so this blogpost will have to do. James Thompson already […]

Schneider, C. (2015). The censor’s hand: the misregulation of human-subject research. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press. Medical and social progress depend on research with human subjects. When that research is done in institutions getting federal money, it is regulated (often minutely) by federally required and supervised bureaucracies called “institutional review boards” (IRBs). Do–can–these IRBs do […]

Doing a lot of background reading on animal ecology, I found this review paper: Lefebvre, L. (2013). Brains, innovations, tools and cultural transmission in birds, non-human primates, and fossil hominins. Frontiers in human neuroscience, 7, 245. Recent work on birds and non-human primates has shown that taxonomic differences in field measures of innovation, tool use […]