New paper out: Human Biodiversity for Beginners: A Review of Charles Murray’s Human Diversity

Kirkegaard, E. O. W. (2020). Human Biodiversity for Beginners: A Review of Charles Murray’s Human Diversity. Mankind Quarterly, 60(3). Journal (gated) Human Diversity is Charles Murray’s latest book. This review evaluates the claims made in the book and places both the author’s theses and their criticisms in their historical context. It concludes that this book…

Gap closers

A lot of these people. Ferguson, R. F. (1998). Can schools narrow the Black–White test score gap?. Kober, N. (2001). It Takes More Than Testing: Closing the Achievement Gap. A Report of the Center on Education Policy. Bainbridge, W. L., & Lasley, T. J. (2002). Demographics, diversity, and K-12 accountability: The challenge of closing the…

New paper out: Public Preferences and Reality: Crime Rates among 70 Immigrant Groups in the Netherlands

Kirkegaard, E. O. W. & de Kuijper, M. (2020). Public Preferences and Reality: Crime Rates among 70 Immigrant Groups in the Netherlands. Mankind Quarterly, 60(3) journal link (gated) We estimated crime rates among 70 origin-based immigrant groups in the Netherlands for the years 2005-2018. Results indicated that crime rates have overall been falling for each…

Stereotype accuracy: summary of some studies

Now that the video is up, here’s some other studies I came across. Falkenberg, L. (1990). Improving the accuracy of stereotypes within the workplace. Journal of Management, 16(1), 107-118. Has a pretty straightforward summary of stereotypes and stereotyping: Organizations experience high levels of inefficiency when decisions are based on inaccurate stereotypes. As humans are dependent…

IVF tech by country: historical growth

Some time ago, I made a plot of this that Steve Hsu ended up posting. However, here’s a newer one. The public datafile is here. Latest published report is here, which reports data for 2014. They publish a paper every year, or so, which report on ~5 year old data. I see no report for…

Open data and behavioral genetics: room for improvement!

Open data is a fundamental part of getting science to work well. Primary reasons for this: Redundancy is data archiving. Most data are lost because no backups exist! Easy access to 3rd parties. For new analyses or error checking previous work. Scientists are human and often refuse access to data for hostile outsiders, preventing them…