Thou shallt not look at the polygenic scores

With the coming of Open Science principles, many scientific institutions who were previously aggressively guarding their data decided to put them out for public consumption. Mostly this means other academics look at them and maybe they get your paper retracted for fraud. But sometimes, amateur scientists also use them for decidedly other purposes than what…

Ancient history, dysgenics, genomics, and cyclical history theory

Prior post: Rise and fall of empires: genetic version? (2017) I found this stuff a while ago, and tweeted it, but I wanted to save it properly so it doesn’t get forgotten again. Blogging is extended memory. I reckon my mortality risk at Twitter is about 30% each year. Accounts have been banned for less….

Comments on “The Inheritance of Inequality” (Bowles & Gintis, 2002)

Some anon sent me this paper, asked if there was a rebuttal somewhere. It’s a well cited economics paper, 1248 citations on Google Scholar. I wasn’t familiar with it, but reading it over, I see some things comment on. Bowles, S., & Gintis, H. (2002). The inheritance of inequality. Journal of economic Perspectives, 16(3), 3-30….

Reference group effects, shifting standards

Probably most social science is done using data that are based on self-report. Thus, they are crucially dependent on assumptions that self-report data reflect objective reality. There are some large studies or meta-analysis that compare self-report to objective results. To take a simple example. Kuncel et al 2005 meta-analyzed self-report GPA versus actual GPA from…

New paper out: The Negative Religiousness-IQ Nexus is a Jensen Effect on Individual-Level Data: A Refutation of Dutton et al.’s ‘The Myth of the Stupid Believer’

Dutton, E., & Kirkegaard, E. O. W. (2021). The Negative Religiousness-IQ Nexus is a Jensen Effect on Individual-Level Data: A Refutation of Dutton et al.’s ‘The Myth of the Stupid Believer.’ Journal of Religion and Health. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-021-01351-1 A recent study by Dutton et al. (J Relig Health 59:1567–1579. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-019-00926-3, 2020) found that the religiousness-IQ nexus…