The low quality of psychology as a field, and how to improve science: reading material

I recently came across an interesting journal: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perspectives_on_Psychological_Science_%28journal%29 It was becus of a recent issue about the status of psychology as a scientific field. Its both distressing and very interesting reading. Here are the papers: Editors Introduction to the Special Section on Replicability in Psychological Science A Crisis of Confidence? Is the Replicability Crisis Overblown…

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Paper: “Positive” Results Increase Down the Hierarchy of the Sciences

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0010068     The hypothesised Hierarchy of the Sciences (henceforth HoS) is reflected inmany social and organizational features of academic life. When 222 scholars rated their perception of similarity between academic disciplines, results showed a clustering along three main dimensions: a ‘‘hard/soft’’ dimension, which roughly corresponded to the HoS; a ‘‘pure/applied’’ dimension, which reflected the…

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A conversation about pseudoscience, psychoanalysis, clarity of language

a conversation with “I said stupid things so i dont want my name here” [04:22:58] Isstsidwmnh: Did I tell you I read “Civilization and its Discontents” by Freud? [04:23:07] Isstsidwmnh: It seemed like a work of good quality. [04:23:17] Isstsidwmnh: I dont understand why individuals (like I suspect you) dislike freud. [04:39:10] Emil – Deleet:…

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Einstein on operationally defining and measuring simplicity

http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/einstein-philscience/ But for all that Einstein’s faith in simplicity was strong, he despaired of giving a precise, formal characterization of how we assess the simplicity of a theory. In 1946 he wrote about the perspective of simplicity (here termed the “inner perfection” of a theory): This point of view, whose exact formulation meets with great…

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Thoughts about SEP’s Naturalism

http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/naturalism/ The term ‘naturalism’ has no very precise meaning in contemporary philosophy. Its current usage derives from debates in America in the first half of the last century. The self-proclaimed ‘naturalists’ from that period included John Dewey, Ernest Nagel, Sidney Hook and Roy Wood Sellars. These philosophers aimed to ally philosophy more closely with science….

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