Comments on “The Inheritance of Inequality” (Bowles & Gintis, 2002)

Some anon sent me this paper, asked if there was a rebuttal somewhere. It’s a well cited economics paper, 1248 citations on Google Scholar. I wasn’t familiar with it, but reading it over, I see some things comment on. Bowles, S., & Gintis, H. (2002). The inheritance of inequality. Journal of economic Perspectives, 16(3), 3-30….

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Reference group effects, shifting standards

Probably most social science is done using data that are based on self-report. Thus, they are crucially dependent on assumptions that self-report data reflect objective reality. There are some large studies or meta-analysis that compare self-report to objective results. To take a simple example. Kuncel et al 2005 meta-analyzed self-report GPA versus actual GPA from…

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New paper out: The Negative Religiousness-IQ Nexus is a Jensen Effect on Individual-Level Data: A Refutation of Dutton et al.’s ‘The Myth of the Stupid Believer’

Dutton, E., & Kirkegaard, E. O. W. (2021). The Negative Religiousness-IQ Nexus is a Jensen Effect on Individual-Level Data: A Refutation of Dutton et al.’s ‘The Myth of the Stupid Believer.’ Journal of Religion and Health. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-021-01351-1 A recent study by Dutton et al. (J Relig Health 59:1567–1579. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-019-00926-3, 2020) found that the religiousness-IQ nexus…

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That 2005 study on IQ and marriage by sex

This study keeps getting attention. This otherwise alright Quillette piece: Mate Selection for Modernity Studies using data from classic online dating websites and speed-dating both found that men exhibited less of a preference for women whose intelligence or ambition exceeded their own. A study by four UK universities found that a woman’s likelihood of marriage…

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