Mainstreamers keep making progress: educational attainment variation “likely” caused by ancestry variation in Europe

Lawson, D. J., Davies, N. M., Haworth, S., Ashraf, B., Howe, L., Crawford, A., … & Timpson, N. J. (2020). Is population structure in the genetic biobank era irrelevant, a challenge, or an opportunity?. Human genetics, 139(1), 23-41. Replicable genetic association signals have consistently been found through genome-wide association studies in recent years. The recent…

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New paper out: Global Ancestry and Cognitive Ability (PNC study)

Lasker, J., Pesta, B. J., Fuerst, J. G., & Kirkegaard, E. O. W. (2019). Global Ancestry and Cognitive Ability. Psych, 1(1), 431-459. Using data from the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort, we examined whether European ancestry predicted cognitive ability over and above both parental socioeconomic status (SES) and measures of eye, hair, and skin color. First, using…

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What you can’t say: genetic group difference edition

Paul Graham‘s 2004 essay What you can’t say had a big influence on me and remains my favorite essay. In he argued essentially that popular morality shows fashion tendencies i.e. that it varies over time but for no evidence-linked reason. What is at one time considered a grievous moral evil is later considered not a…

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Environmentalists like admixture analysis too (until they don’t)

See previous post about quotes from the medical genetics and physical anthropology literature on admixture analysis and the causal interpretation. There’s quite a few older admixture studies that examined relationships between racial ancestry and intelligence. Most of these used quite crude methods such as interviewer judgement. Some used a better method, namely objectively measured skin…

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New paper out: Admixture in Argentina (with John Fuerst)

We have a new big paper out: Kirkegaard, E. O. W., & Fuerst, J. (2017). Admixture in Argentina. Mankind Quarterly, 57(4). Retrieved from http://mankindquarterly.org/archive/issue/57-4/4 Abstract Analyses of the relationships between cognitive ability, socioeconomic outcomes, and European ancestry were carried out at multiple levels in Argentina: individual (max. n = 5,920), district (n = 437), municipal…

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Nisbett’s 2009 book on Intelligence: reviews

Nisbett’s 2009 book on intelligence, Intelligence and how to get it, is a goldmine of stupid claims that one can quote-mine for introduction and discussion sections of papers. For instance, Nisbett tries to argue that brain size is not causal for intelligence! He writes: The correlation between cranial capacity and IQ is probably about .30-.40…

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Individual genomic admixture and cognitive ability

So, I posted this: Abstract We used data from the PING study (n≈1200) to examine the relationship between cognitive ability, socioeconomic outcomes and genomic racial ancestry. We found that when genomic ancestry was not included in models, self-reported race/ethnicity (SIRE) was a useful predictor of cognitive ability/S, but when genomic ancestry was included, SIRE lost…

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The sibling control design

A friend of mine and his brother just received their 23andme results. In a table they look like this (I have added myself for comparison): Macrorace Bro1 Bro2 Emil European 52.6 53 99.8 MENA 42.5 41.3 0.2 South Asian 2.8 3.4 0 East Asian & Amerindian 1.1 0.7 0 Sub-Saharan African 0.5 0.5 0 Oceanian…

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