Comments on “The Inheritance of Inequality” (Bowles & Gintis, 2002)

Some anon sent me this paper, asked if there was a rebuttal somewhere. It’s a well cited economics paper, 1248 citations on Google Scholar. I wasn’t familiar with it, but reading it over, I see some things comment on. Bowles, S., & Gintis, H. (2002). The inheritance of inequality. Journal of economic Perspectives, 16(3), 3-30….

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Seeds of Science: another free to publish attempt at reforming the scientific publishing process

A large number of scientists believe the scientific publishing ecosystem is quite broken, in the sense that it favors flashy improbable findings over rigorous research. This positivity and novelty bias is so strong that some large proportion of newly claimed findings are actually ‘false positives’ or at best grossly overestimated. On top of this, there…

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Reference group effects, shifting standards

Probably most social science is done using data that are based on self-report. Thus, they are crucially dependent on assumptions that self-report data reflect objective reality. There are some large studies or meta-analysis that compare self-report to objective results. To take a simple example. Kuncel et al 2005 meta-analyzed self-report GPA versus actual GPA from…

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